Haters are going to hate but…how far is too far?

As sports fans, we have the capability and freedom of choosing which side we want to become victorious. As intense of a game, match or fight that’s being viewed, trash talking is always on display as fans tend to show how passionate they about their favorite athlete or team. But nowadays, things can go 0-100 real quick in which disturbing, racist remarks are often being made on a social platform such as Twitter. A prime example of this is the tweets that were being tweeted during the Floyd Mayweather/Manny Pacquaio bout. As Mayweather went on to win in convincing fashion, there were some extremely jealous fans ranting about the champ using nothing but derogatory terms to describe him.

According to Hashtag.org, reports are saying that Mayweather was called the N-word by thousands of users after he was announced the winner of the bout. Hispanic Twitter users added their opinions on the matter by calling Floyd an “Mayate” in hispanic terms means Black beetle. Flipinos and Asian Twitter users referred to the champ as “Nognog”, which means N***** in and “Sunog” which means burned, as ways to describe and degrade dark skinned people.

nigger

(http://melanoidnation.org)

nognog

(http://melanoidnation.org)

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(http://melanoidnation.org)

With the recent accusation of Pac-Man’s injury shoulder being used as a “excuse” for his performance during the world title bout, heavy trash talking will escalate to much higher levels. Although people have the right to express themselves on social media such as Twitter, sports fans may want to bring down the content of their tweets. Even though these athletes are multi-millionaires, they are human beings who is passionate of entertaining their fans to their best of abilities. As a rematch between these two gladiators are more than likely to be organized, let’s hope fans find some kind of volume in the content of their tweets. After all, these are the same athletes who can receive access to the same Twitter accounts to observe what are being said about them. Tweet wisely, sports fans.

-Omari White

Follow Omari on Twitter & IG (@SmooveGuyO) as he talks about life, music and sports.